Peripheral Artery Disease
VASCULAR
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KNOW THE FACTS,
KNOW THE RISK
What you should know about PAD

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PAD.

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerotic disease. The majority of PAD patients are asymptomatic but when symptoms do appear, atypical leg pain - also known as intermittent claudication - is the most common. Non-healing wounds are another symptom of PAD.

Causes and risk factors include:

Atherosclerosis
Hypertension
High Cholesterol
Abdominal Obesity
Advanced Age
Smoking
Diabetes Mellitus
Family History of PAD or coronary artery disease (CAD)
Kidney disease

Risk factors for PAD are also similar to those for CAD and most patients may be suffering from both. Diabetes and PAD are also linked.

The key to treating PAD is early detection. If any of the above risk factors sound like they might pertain to you, ask your physician for a diagnostic test. If needed your doctor can work with you to determine a treatment plan best for you.  

Peripheral Artery Disease

PAD Prevalence

PAD IS MOST PREVALENT AMONG THE ELDERLY, AFRICAN-AMERICANS AND WOMEN5

WHY ARE SOME POPULATIONS AT HIGHER RISK?

There are major discrepancies in awareness of PAD among different groups. And some groups have heightened risk factors.

Because of their high amputation rates, African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans, are heavily impacted by PAD. Among African-Americans, Latinos, and Whites, African-Americans also have the highest rate of hypertension, with Hispanics having the highest rate of diabetes.6 Moreover, women - particularly African-American females - are more likely than men to experience graft failure or limb loss.7

Peripheral Artery Disease

TAKE CONTROL
Take Control

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH BY STAYING INFORMED

Learning the basics about PAD can help with early detection - the key to treating PAD. Here are some resources to help you get started:

SCAI.ORG | VASCULAR.ORG | NHLBI.NIH.GOV

References:
1. AHA Statistical Update, Circulation.
2013; 127-e6-e245
A.S. Go
2. 
www.medscape.com - Peripheral Arterial Disease Affects More Women Than Men
3. Journal for Vascular Surgery. Vol 52:6; 1616-1652
JW Olin, et al.
4. Current Opinion in Endocrinology & Diabetes 2003, 10(4) p.256-258
Assessing and Treating Peripheral Vascular Disease in Diabetes
Gary W. Gibbons, MD et al.
5. American Heart Association, Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, 2013 update
6. www.cardiovascularcoalition.com Racial Disparities in Amputation Rates for the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Database, 2016
7. www.medscape.com - Peripheral Arterial Disease Affects More Women Than Men
8. Peripheral Artery Disease Compendium, Epidemiology of Peripheral Artery Disease. Circ. 2015
Aboyans Criqui
9. www.medscape.com - Peripheral Arterial Disease Affects More Women Than Men

AP2945542-US Rev. A

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